Home Improvements: Why a Home Improvement Can Be Small

Small effort can mean big results.   As I sit with my newborn I think like this all the time.    I think, "If I only have 45 minutes during this next nap, what can I get done that I’ll feel good about?”  or “I’m exhausted but I have chores.   What is the smallest thing I can do to feel progress?”  or my favorite “Hooray, I took meat out of the freezer! Dinner is practically done!”    Silly maybe, but I’m guessing I am not alone there.

Making home improvements can actually be like this too. Too often people think that to make a home improvement they have to commit weeks and weeks to meetings and discussions and shopping and details.   I think people worry about the thousands of dollars it will cost to replace every single window in their house or to do everything they dream about all at once.   It really doesn’t have to be like that.  We have lots of customers that talk to us about their dreams and then we work together to figure out what part of that dream they can accomplish first.   Maybe it’s just the windows in the living room, maybe it’s the windows in the front of the house, or maybe it’s the whole first level.   My point is that it doesn’t need to be a huge overwhelming process.   It can short.   It can be focused.  And it can be inside your budget.

Not ready to replace your windows?  No problem.  There are a number of small home improvements you can make that will take very small effort or expense, but can make a big change in how a space looks and feels.   So get ready, I’ve put together my favorite ideas!

Top 5 ways to quickly brighten up a space

  1. Buy a large flowering basket or plant a large pot of colorful annuals to put in front of your house for instant curb appeal.
  2. Replace the hardware on kitchen cabinets.
  3. Choose a bright lampshade to brighten up a dull space.
  4. Switch up the linens you use in the bathroom.   A few bright hand towels and new rug will make small space seem new again!
  5. Keep a centerpiece on the kitchen table, the dining room table, or any surface that you see a lot.   Fresh flowers, bowls of fresh fruit, or even a stack of books can make boring spaces seem completely different.

No matter what small change you make to your living space, just make sure you love it.    When you want to talk about replacing a few windows or doors, give us a call. We’d love to work with you!

Melissa Brager

Why customers love UniShield Windows

How are windows different?

 

Window Terminology: Window Terms Starting with "S"

Safety Glass

A strengthened or reinforced glass that is less subject to breakage or splintering.  Also called tempered glass.

Sash

The portion of a window that you open and close.

Screen

Woven mesh of metal, plastic, or fiberglass stretched over a window opening to permit air to pass through, but not insects.  Screens come standard with UniShield windows.

Sealant

A compressible plastic material used to seal any opening or junction of two parts, such as between the glass and a vinyl sash, commonly made of silicone, butyl tape, or polysulfide.

Sill

The ledge on the front of the interior of the window

Single-Hung Window

A window consisting of two sashes of glass but only the bottom sash opens.  The top sash always stays stationary and cannot be opened for air flow

Sliding Glass Door

A door fitted with one or more panels that move on rollers horizontally on a track and/or in grooves.  Also called a patio door.

Sliding Window / Slider window

A window fitted with one or more sashes opening by sliding horizontally.

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC)

The fraction of solar radiation admitted through a window or skylight, both directly transmitted, and absorbed and subsequently released inward. The solar heat gain coefficient has replaced the shading coefficient as the standard indicator of a window's shading ability. It is expressed as a number between 0 and 1. The lower a window's solar heat gain coefficient, the less solar heat it transmits, and the greater its shading ability. SHGC can be expressed in terms of the glass alone or can refer to the entire window assembly.

Super Spacer

Glass spacing system made of a structural foam that keeps the edge of the glass warmer.   The foam does not transmit heat or cold through the window, and it is flexible enough to move with the entire glass package allowing the seal to hold significantly longer than metal or aluminum spacers.

 

For more information on window terminology, and to get your free quote on replacement windows from Universal Windows Direct, MN contact us today